Category Archives: Synchronicity

If offered one wish, can we wish for more?

 

I have an oracle app on my phone called Faces of Faerie, by Brian Froud, the designer of movies like The Dark Crystal and Labyrinth. The oracle told me “Make a wish” and this got me thinking:

What if I really had been granted a wish?

At first I considered the old standard “I wish for all the money I’ll ever need”, but I decided to take this seriously, just for fun. I’ve seen the movie Bedazzled (a comedy about a man named Elliot Richards who sells his soul for seven wishes) and even wrote a comedy novel called Be Careful What You Witch For! about a woman who wishes for a more interesting life and gets it.    

Mayhem can happen if you mess around with something like this. “Fools rush in,” they say.

Then I thought, “What if I wish for more wishes?”

A flood of stories filled my head about characters who have been granted a wish and were told that’s not allowed.

But is that true?

Is there really a rule somewhere that says you can’t wish for more wishes? If so, says who? And, are they the boss of me?

I’ve been granted a wish and I want to spend it wisely. I don’t want to end up like Elliot Richards who asks to be the most sensitive man in the world and gets what he wishes for!

Given the opportunity, what would you wish for?

By the way, here’s you some disruptive dogs!


lisa author shotLisa Bonnice is an award-winning, best-selling author. Her current passion-project is a series of metaphysical comedy novels. The first in the series is Be Careful What You Witch For!, a modern-day fairy tale about Lola Garnett, a bored housewife and office drone who wakes up with unexpected psychic abilities, and no instruction manual, and Twink, the reluctant, sarcastic faery assigned to assist and educate her. Its sequel, Patterns in the Chaos, is in the works.

http://www.lisabonnice.com

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My book was pirated–I’m somebody now!

When I was doing standup comedy for a living, I worked with Tim Allen a lot, before he got famous. I knew Tim had made it big when I saw his name as a clue in a TV Guide crossword puzzle. Well, I may not be that famous, but I just discovered that one of my ebooks is being offered as a torrent. These days, that counts for something. My work is now virtual currency!

Honestly, my initial reaction was, “Hey! That’s not cool!” and I looked into having it removed because of copyright infringement, but then I thought again. My  reason for caring is because the book is out of print, not because of the pirating issue. I’m rewriting it, and I didn’t want the first version of this book to be available anymore.

Meet Lola Garnett, a bored housewife, mom and office drone who wakes up with unexpected psychic abilities, and no instruction manual, and Twink, the reluctant, sarcastic fairy assigned to assist and educate her.  In this first book in a series, middle-aged Lola has resigned herself to an unsatisfying life of servitude as a wife, mother and office drone. The American Dream she's living feels more like a coma, and she secretly longs for a more meaningful life. In a perfect demonstration of "be careful what you wish for…" she gets her wish when she wakes up from a nap one day with extrasensory abilities and powers.  The adventure really kicks into gear once she learns that her condition is the result of a botched spell coming from across the street, where her wanna-be-witch neighbor, Melinda Underwood, is foolishly playing with powers she doesn't understand. Lola’s untrained intuition tells her that Melinda intends to use her equal, yet opposite, powers for evil against innocent people.  With the help of a tiny, sarcastic, ethereal sidekick, can Lola overcome her helpless resignation to overthrow Melinda's evil plot and, while she's at it, find her own self worth?

Cover art by Justin Spyres

I originally wrote Be Careful What You Witch For! in the first person, as Lola Garnett, an Ohio woman who wakes up from a nap with magical abilities and no instruction manual. She is eventually assigned a pissed off fairy as a sidekick/instructor. Hijinks, of course, ensue.

The problem is that Lola isn’t a writer, she’s just an average person, so the writing style is intentionally obtuse. When it was time to begin writing the sequel, I wanted to tell it in the third person POV so I won’t have to limit myself to just what Lola could know about. But that means I had to rewrite Book One, first. That’s what I’ve been working on, and it’s slow going. I’d really rather just move on to Book Two.

So I’m thinking … maybe this is the Big U’s way of telling me to just get on with Book Two and don’t bother rewriting the first book. Maybe the fact that it’s already out there, beyond my control now, means that I’m supposed to let go of it. What do you think? If you’ve read the book, visit my Facebook page to let me know if you think it’s fine, as is, or if it needs to be rewritten as a third person narrative.

Thanks!

Synchronicity from Scotland

Mel Gibson's version of Robert the Bruce

Mel Gibson’s version of Robert the Bruce

There was a flaw in my family tree. Years ago, I had traced my mom’s dad’s lineage all the way up to Robert the Bruce (the cutie pie* King of Scotland, in Braveheart) but it just didn’t feel right. I didn’t know how or even what to fix. I was reluctant to mention this factoid in blogs about the planning of our trip to Scotland, because I wanted to be accurate but sensed that I wasn’t.

Turns out, I was wrong, but what I love most about this story is how I found out.

As part of the trip, I’m tracking down our family trees so we can visit ancestral sites. Part of Jeff’s family comes from Wales and England, and much of mine comes from Scotland, England and Ireland. I’ve been actively searching again for my Scottish roots, looking for the flaw that I knew was there, but coming up empty.

Out of the blue, I got a message on the Ancestry.com site from a probable distant relative in Scotland with a brief message about the information I had found, years ago, for my great-grandmother. The message said only: “I have doubts about her parents.”

Sure enough, that was the branch that led us to royalty.

With the new information he offered in subsequent emails, I redid the whole thing, and along the way found actual addresses for my great-grandparents! I learned that my grandfather, who I didn’t know, lived in desperate conditions in a coal-mining family, and all of his direct ancestors did as well. They lived in hard times, a far cry from princes and princesses. It’s a fascinating story, and the local historical societies are bubbling with all of the information I need to actually stand in the same locations as my ancestors.

Once I learned as much as I could about the most recent generations, I started to go up the branches to see how far back I could take it this time. I didn’t expect much, because no one cared enough about the unwashed masses back then to keep track of them beyond the census. But eventually I discovered a pretty strong limb that was taking me back into the same surnames that I recognized from last time: Bruce and Stewart.

It turns out that I am not, indeed, the 22nd granddaughter of Robert I, King of Scots. I am, however, the 22nd granddaughter of his brother, Edward the Bruce, King of Ireland!

I love how the Big U delivered this information to me in such a quirky way. It feels like a hole was punched into the time/space continuum at the perfect time to open this portal to my Scottish heritage. I’m doing a wee jig, as we speak!


* in reality, King Robert was probably horribly disfigured from leprosy.

What he probably actually looked like.

Follow my progress on GiveIt100.com!